Monday, April 28, 2014

GURPS101: Spell Kits For Casters - The Necromancer

 http://api.ning.com/files/I0fvYV0V5N5xQvjRvTm9qnFtc*QLhrlN7*pYsLm7-sKrHLC5lkcT1yQLheLQzlASrwrqQDqbOaNRhJ6oSVtVqpAAuHpyxb*1/NecromancerCover_Springborg.jpg

"In glamoury that necromancer held his hosts of phantoms and of wandering ghosts..."
- The Lay of Leithian, J. R. R. Tolkien

In a previous post, I talked about various "wizardly" archetypes and how you might create them using RPM. In this post (and successive ones if it continues to prove popular), I'm going to outline the best spells to take for Ritual Mastery, a possible list of conditional spells/charms/potions/etc., a list of traits, and a typical course of action for such a character in combat. You might consider looking at my "Diablorising Ritual Path Magic" posts for that game's Necromancer. You can find them here, here, and here. Lets continue on with the Necromancer:


On The Summoning of Beasts
The following little system works well for anything you conjure, create, or summon - but I've put it here to determine how "powerful" a skeleton or zombie might be. Rituals that conjure or summon beings are common in fiction, but Ritual Path magic has no current way to handle a delineation of power or scale. Currently, it takes a Lesser Sense Spirit and a Lesser Strengthen Crossroads effect to find a demon and set up a temporary gate. You'd need to add +10 energy for crossing dimensions and because there is no specific target, there is no "connection" penalties for non-adepts. Of course if you are trying to summon a specific target, those penalties are added back in.

New Spell Modifier: Summoned
Use this modifier for summoning or conjuring beings. This modifier relies on a "Static Point Total" that the GM chooses, typically the starting point total of the campaign - though it may be higher. The more powerful the being, the more energy required. A GM is well within his rights to say that archangels, demon lords, and similarly powerful beings cannot be  summoned - only contacted. For such beings use a Greater Sense Spirit effect, make a reaction roll (pray it's good!), and remember to add the extra energy for crossing dimensions. Bad reactions should result in minions of the being appearing and causing havoc, while good ones result in an audience of sorts. GMs running campaigns where the point totals of the monsters are not known or were not tabulated (like GURPS Monster Hunters), should assign a summoning value they feel is appropriate. Use the chart below to determine the extra energy required to summon a being of a specific point total.

Power                 Additional Energy Cost
25%                   +4 energy
50%                   +8 energy
75%                   +12 energy
100%                 +20 energy
150%                 +40 energy
+50%                 +20 energy

For multiple beings, multiply the cost by the number of beings. If there are more than five, use the following:

Group                 Additional Energy Cost
6-10 beings         x6 energy
11-20 beings       x8 energy
21-50 beings       x10 energy
11-100 beings     x12 energy
x10                     plus x6 energy


Higher Purpose (Animating Undead)
... spells to create, conjure, or summon undead minions.
... spells to repair said minions.
... spells to locate or scry on one of your minions.
... spells to toughen, strengthen, or otherwise enhance your minions.
... spells that let you bind "free range" undead into your service.
... and so on.


Higher Purpose (Death Magic)
... spells that locate the dead.
... spells that allow you to speak or otherwise communicate with the dead.
... spells that allow you to lay the dead to rest.
... spells that sap the strength of the living by employing "death energies."
... spells that ward against undead, spooks, specters, or ghosts.
... spells that allow you to bind and compel undead to your service.
... spells that allow you to heal the living or "prevent" death by temporarily stabilizing them.


Ritual Mastery/Conditional Spell List
Amplify (GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 39) 
Bag of Bones (GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 39)
Call Spirit (GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 39)
Death Touch (GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 40)
Death Vision (GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 40)
Destruction (GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 40)
Empower Undead (see below)
Halt Death (see below)
Life-Force Absorption (see below)
Necrosis (GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 47)
Pentagram Trap(GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 47)
Reaper Bolt (see below)
Reveal the Dead (see below)
Summon Skeleton (see below)
Summon Skeleton Horde (see below)
Weaken Blood (GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 51)


Suggested Character Traits
Allies (undead minions)  [varies]
Channeling (Magical, -10%; Specialized, Ghosts (-50%) [4].
Compartmentalized Mind 1 (Limited, Path of Undead only, -30% or Limited , Necromancy, -20%; Magic, -10%; No Mental Separation, -20%) [20/level or 25/level].
Damage Resistance (Force Field, +20%; Limited, Necromantic effects, -30%; Magic, -10%) [4/level].
Detect (Undead, Ghosts, or specific form of undead; Magic, -10%) [18, 9, 5].
Energy Reserve (Mana Reserve; One Power, Path of Undead only, -50%) [1.5/level].
Higher Purpose (Animating Undead, Death Magic, or Necromancy*) [5/level].
Leech [varies]
Magery (Ritual Path; Limited Scope, Path of Undead, -30%) or Magery (Ritual Path; Limited Scope, Necromancy, -15%) [7/level or 8.5/level].
Medium (Magical, -10%; Specialized, Ghosts (-50%) [4].
Racial Skill Bonus +1 to +3 (Path of Undead) [2/level]. GMs may allow specialist casters to possess this trait (see p. B452 for details), though he should probably require them to start out with it. He may even allow the Natural at (skill) trait.
Resistant to Necromancy or Path of Undead (+3 or +8; Magic, -10%) [5 or 9].
Ritual Adept (Limited Scope, Path of Undead, -30% or Limited Scope, Necromancy, -15%) [28 or 34].
Skills: Alchemy, Expert Skill (Demonology, Thanatology, or Pneumatology), First Aid, Hidden Lore (Demons, Spirits, Undead, or Zombies), Occultism, Physiology, Professional Skill (Mortician), Surgery,
Unaging (Magic, -10%) [14].
Unkillable 1-3 (Magic, -10%) [45, 90, or 135].
* Necromancy is a Broad Tradition (Pyramid #3/66 Laws of Magic, p. 16) and encompasses all the effects of Higher Purpose (Animated Undead) and Higher Purpose (Death Magic) plus any spell that summons demons, and any ritual that deals with the dead or undead in any way.


Tactics in Combat
The Necromancer, depending on how you built your character can be extremely useful in combat. With a list of spells that can maim, cripple, or kill at their command. Necromancers excel at sending hordes of disposal minions at their targets or blasting them into dust, but they're also good at being healers. Who better to patch up the living than the guy, who has been studying corpses his whole life? You'll want to invest several charms with various attack and healing spells and try to focus on using your minions to swarm a target to make it "softer" for another player character or yourself when you chuck a Reaper Bolt or three.



New Rituals

Empower Undead
Spell Effects: Greater Strengthen Undead.
Inherent Modifiers: Altered Traits, Special.
Greater Effects: 1 (x3).

This spell causes one undead subject to temporarily gain up to 30 points of enhanced physical attributes or advantages for the next hour. 

Typical Casting: Greater Strengthen Undead (3) + Altered Traits, 30 points of traits chosen by the caster* (30) + Duration, 1 hour (3) + Subject Weight, 300 lbs. (3). 108 energy (39x3).
* These points must be something that the undead could acquire anyways given time and experience. The caster could not, for example, give a skeleton wings. Normally, you'd have to spell out exactly what the subject would acquire, but the added flexibility plus this limitation makes this effectively a feature.


Halt Death
Spell Effects: Greater Strengthen Body.
Inherent Modifiers: Bestows a Bonus, Survival rolls  against death.
Greater Effects: 1 (x3).

This spell causes one subject (who must be within two yards of you) who just failed a HT roll versus death to reroll with a +5 bonus. If successful he stabilizes long enough for someone else to use a healing spell, first aid, etc.

Typical Casting: Greater Strengthen Body (3) + Bestows a Bonus, +5 to Survival rolls against death (16) + Subject Weight, 300 lbs. (3). 63 energy (21x3).


Life-Force Absorption
Spell Effects: Greater Transform Body.
Inherent Modifiers: Area of Effect + Internal Damage, Draining (Aura)
Greater Effects: 1 (x3).

This spell surrounds the caster with a field that leeches the life out of anything in it's reach (ten yards from the caster). Anyone within the field suffers 1d-3 points of damage and the caster gains the same amount if they fail to resist. This field lasts for 5d6 seconds before the spell lapses.

Typical Casting: Greater Transform Body (3) + Area of Effect, 10 yards (8) + Internal Damage, Draining 18d (Aura, +80%) (74) + Subject Weight, 300 lbs. (3). 258 energy (88x3).


Reaper Bolt
Spell Effects: Greater Create Undead.
Inherent Modifiers: External Damage, Corrosion (Cosmic, Lingering Damage; Guided).
Greater Effects: 1 (x3).

This ritual allows the caster to summon up a small amount of death energy in his hand and fling it at a target for 3d corrosion damage. You ignore range penalties to hit as per a Guided attack (p. B105) and any damage you inflict requires natural healing to recover!

Typical Casting: Greater Create Undead (6) + External Damage, Corrosion 3d (Cosmic, Lingering Damage, +100%; Guided, +50%) (30) + Subject Weight, 300 lbs. (3). 117 energy (39x3).


Reveal the Dead
Spell Effects: Greater Sense Undead.
Inherent Modifiers: None.
Greater Effects: 1 (x3).

This ritual tells the location of all undead within 200 yards of him, what type they are, if they are bound to a particular purpose or master, and if hidden via a disguise, reveals the creature beneath if it fails to resist the spell.

Typical Casting: Greater Sense Undead (2). 6 energy (2x3).


Summon Skeleton
Spell Effects: Greater Create Undead.
Inherent Modifiers: Summoned.
Greater Effects: 1 (x3).

This spell conjures a skeleton to do the caster's bidding for the next day.

Typical Casting: Greater Create Undead (6) + Duration, 1 day (7) + Summoned, 25% of total (4). 51 energy (17x3).


Summon Skeleton Horde
Spell Effects: Greater Create Undead.
Inherent Modifiers: Summoned, Group.
Greater Effects: 1 (x3).

This spell conjures a ill of undead, six skeletons to do the caster's bidding for the next day.

Typical Casting: Greater Create Undead (6) + Duration, 1 day (7) + Summoned, 25% of total, Group, 6-10 (24). 111 energy (37x3).

Sunday, April 27, 2014

Gamemaster's Guidepost: Character Point Debt


 http://www.snitchseeker.com/gallery/albums/userpics/84186/normal_mURI_temp_03c68b8b.jpg

Character point debt...hmmm. It can be annoying and it can be a wash, depending on the GM and the player. First, in case you're not familiar with the concept, there is only one mention of it in the Basic Set (p. B295) and that is:
The GM might opt to let you pay for your new abilities by going into “point debt”: any point cost in excess of what you can afford becomes negative unspent points, and until this debt is gone, all future bonus points must go toward paying it off.
Some GMs don't use it at all: If you don't got the points, you don't get the pretties. Others use it, but sparingly. Some (like me) use it balls to the wall - but only in certain situations. I think it's a wonderful tool for both GMs and players alike - if used correctly.

Not Using It
This is probably the easiest option. Put simply, if you don't have the points for it...you ain't getting it. This makes sense for many campaigns, and can put a halt to PCs spending a ton of cash to artificially inflate their point totals. It doesn't matter if you're 200 points in debt if you've got teh new awesome cool bio- and cybermods. Who cares about paying back the points when you can just go get new, more, better enhancements.


Using It, With Restrictions
This one is "standard" as far as GURPS goes. If there is some form Transformation available (p. B294), there is probably some form of point debt. The GM could restrict it so only certain forms of transformations actually benefit from this, but that's probably not a good idea, unless he intentionally wants one form of modification to be better than any other.


Using It, No Restrictions
I use this in my own campaigns, because I'm more about characterization than I am about characters. That is, if a character should have a trait I or the players have forgotten, and it comes up in game, the character has it. He'll have to pay for it later with his earned points - but for now, he has it. It makes more sense to me for a doctor to have Pharmacy (Synthetic) than not to have it or to pick it up later. Frankly, it causes dissonance for me if done the latter way. Why wouldn't he have used his skill to figure out what the demon-infected new painkiller did the first time instead of the second time? No, better to be "debt" and playing a plausible character than picking it up later. What does it matter if you pay for it now or later? Some GMs don't like this because it feels like "cheating" (or so I've been told). But my players love it and so do I. I've yet had a complaint about it and in the end, the points are paid back.


When To Use It
Now, I'm not advocating something like "But, oh G.O.D.*, I do not have the super-smiter skill, and it would be really useful for me to have right now. Can I please have it?" "Nay, Munchkin. Thou art an abomination before thine table." I'm talking about situations like "Hmmm, I don't have Swimming...my character grew up in Florida...I should probably have that." Yes, yes you should, O Player of the Forgetful Floridian. It shouldn't be used to amplify a player's power - just fill in obvious gaps. Again, I'm not advocating that you just give the player whatever trait he needs (though sometimes that is a option as well), but to simply let him pay for it later. It's sort of like a "rent-to-own" character trait.
* "Game Operational Director"


Picking Over the Bones
As you can probably tell by my many posts - I am a Rule Zero kind of guy - the GM is not just required to run a game. He's NEEDED. Once you set up a campaign, you need someone to be the arbitrator. Usually the person who made the setting and the person who runs it are the same, but this isn't always the case. There are people who disagree with that philosophy...but they usually end up alone or playing video games. Pity them, for they are sad beings. When it comes down to it, role-playing games are not just a hobby, they're a collaborative act. An act of story-telling between you and your friends. The entire reason there are rules is so that there are guidelines so no one can hit the "I win" button every time - and frankly - that'd be boring. The reason there are dice is, so we can have a little randomness and not be controlled entirely by the rules. And finally, the reason there is a GM is, so he can ignore the dice and the rules so that we have fun. Without these three things working in concert, you tend to get a boring - or at least one-sided game. The GM tells you what your character is going to do and you have no recourse but to agree or argue. Either way...boring. That said, and more on point, it might seem unfair to all other players if the GM gives the forgetful player points to salve holes in his character that do not meet up with his background, but remember, the player still has to pay points for them. And in doing so he is less likely to learn new skills or acquire new traits that are available in play, but not at the start of the campaign. This subtle, but key difference can weed out any abuse of the Point Debt rules before they even happen. If the premise of the campaign is "No one knows any supernatural skills or powers, but can learn them in play" then those who have made sure their characters are what they are supposed to be will have those spare points to acquire said traits in play.

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Triple Threat: Death Mauler

http://diablo.incgamers.com/gallery/data/513/medium/xmonsterart-15huge.jpg
Note: This creature is directly inspired by the monster of the same name from Diablo II: Lord of Destruction.


Death Mauler
The Death Mauler is an earth demon that dwells deep within the network of subterranean caverns of the Burning Hells. They are well protected by a hard shell bristling with spikes and a thick, gnarled hide. Hulking, tenacious beasts with the strength of twenty men, they can attack at close range with enormous claws or use their special attack to strike from a distance. Be wary of this ranged attack - the Death Mauler can discharge long, burrowing tentacles from his hands that travel quickly and surreptitiously under the ground, bursting forth and impaling his opponents.

For Any Game...

ST: 20                    HP: 25                   Speed: 6.00
DX: 14                   Will: 12                Move: 8
IQ: 9                      Per: 12                  Weight: 2,000 lbs.
HT: 12                   FP: 12                   SM: +1                  
Dodge: 10             Parry: 10              DR: 6

Claws (14): 2d-1 cutting or impaling. Reach C-1.
Thorny Hide (14): 1d-2 impaling. Roll once per opponent per turn of combat to those in Close Combat with you. Roll at +2 from those who attack you from behind.
Root Tendrils (14): 3d impaling. Range is anywhere that the Death Mauler can see (and he takes no penalties), as long as their target is touching the ground or within one hex of it. This automatically ignores any DR gained from cover and inflicts a -2 to penalty to defend against it as the attack comes from underneath. The first time a character encounters a Death Mauler who attacks this way he is surprised unless he has 360º Vision or Peripheral Vision. Optionally, those with Danger Sense may defend at -2 on a successful use of their ability. Those who have seen a Death Mauler or know how it attacks defend as above.

Traits:  360º Vision; Appearance (Horrific); Constriction Attack; Doesn’t Breathe; Doesn’t Eat or Drink Doesn’t Sleep; High Pain Threshold; Immunity to Metabolic Hazards; Indomitable; Injury Tolerance (Homogenous, No Blood; No Vitals); Night Vision 9; No Fine Manipulators; Permeation (Earth); Supernatural Durability (Can only be killed by damage from supernatural sources); Unfazeable; Vibration Sense (Hearing; Accessibility, Targets must be touching the ground)
Skills: Brawling-14; Camaflouge-12; Stealth-14; Survival (Underground)-14; Wrestling-14.
Notes: Elemental creature. If the GM is using Intrinsic Fright Check GURPS Horror, (p. 139),  Death Maulers have a modifier of -4.


For Dungeon Fantasy...
ST: 20                    HP: 25                   Speed: 6.00
DX: 14                   Will: 12                Move: 8
IQ: 9                      Per: 12                  Weight: 2,000 lbs.
HT: 12                   FP: 12                   SM: +1                  
Dodge: 10             Parry: 11              DR: 6

Claws (14): 2d-1 cutting or impaling. Reach C-1.
Thorny Hide (14): 1d-2 impaling. Roll once per opponent per turn of combat to those in Close Combat with you. Roll at +2 from those who attack you from behind.
Root Tendrils (14): 3d impaling. Range is anywhere that the Death Mauler can see (and he takes no penalties), as long as their target is touching the ground or within one hex of it. This automatically ignores any DR gained from cover and inflicts a -2 to penalty to defend against it as the attack comes from underneath. The first time a character encounters a Death Mauler who attacks this way he is surprised unless he has 360º Vision or Peripheral Vision. Optionally, those with Danger Sense may defend at -2 on a successful use of their ability. Those who have seen a Death Mauler or know how it attacks defend as above.

Traits:  360º Vision; Appearance (Horrific); Constriction Attack; Doesn’t Breathe; Doesn’t Eat or Drink Doesn’t Sleep; High Pain Threshold; Immunity to Metabolic Hazards; Indomitable; Injury Tolerance (Homogenous, No Blood; No Vitals); Night Vision 9; No Fine Manipulators; Permeation (Earth); Supernatural Durability (Can only be killed by damage from supernatural sources); Unfazeable; Vibration Sense (Hearing; Accessibility, Targets must be touching the ground)
Skills: Brawling-14; Camaflouge-12; Stealth-14; Survival (Underground)-14; Wrestling-14.
Classification: Elemental.
Notes: Unwilling to negotiate. Truly evil.


For Monster Hunters...
ST: 20                    HP: 25                  Speed: 6.00
DX: 14                   Will: 12                Move: 8
IQ: 9                      Per: 12                  Weight: 2,000 lbs.
HT: 12                   FP: 12                   SM: +1                  
Dodge: 10             Parry: 13              DR: 6

Fright Check: -4

Claws (14): 2d-1 cutting or impaling. Reach C-1. This is performed as a Deceptive Attack (-2 to Active Defenses).
Thorny Hide (14): 1d-2 impaling. Roll once per opponent per turn of combat to those in Close Combat with you. Roll at +2 from those who attack you from behind.
Root Tendrils (14): 3d impaling. Range is anywhere that the Death Mauler can see (and he takes no penalties), as long as their target is touching the ground or within one hex of it. This automatically ignores any DR gained from cover and inflicts a -2 to penalty to defend against it as the attack comes from underneath. The first time a character encounters a Death Mauler who attacks this way he is surprised unless he has 360º Vision or Peripheral Vision. Optionally, those with Danger Sense may defend at -2 on a successful use of their ability. Those who have seen a Death Mauler or know how it attacks defend as above.

Traits:  360º Vision; Appearance (Horrific); Constriction Attack; Doesn’t Breathe; Doesn’t Eat or Drink Doesn’t Sleep; High Pain Threshold; Immunity to Metabolic Hazards; Indomitable; Injury Tolerance (Homogenous, No Blood); Night Vision 9; No Fine Manipulators; Permeation (Earth); Supernatural Durability (Can only be killed by damage from supernatural sources); Unfazeable; Vibration Sense (Hearing; Accessibility, Targets must be touching the ground)
Skills: Brawling-18; Camaflouge-16; Stealth-16; Survival (Underground)-16; Wrestling-18.
Notes: Earth Elemental. Use the skills listed under Demon or Free-Willed in the Know Thy Enemy box in Monster Hunters 1 (p. 16). One to two champions should be able to handle a single Death Mauler.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Gamemaster's Guidepost: Ritual Path Magic, Wishes, and Permanently Granted Traits


http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100524195605/disney/images/a/a7/Aladdin_genie.jpg
Inspired by +Peter V. Dell'Orto's posts about Wishes (you can read them, here, here, and here), as well as this post and this thread (which ultimately didn't pan out for the reasons I discussed in there), I got to thinking: What would a "wish" spell look like in Ritual Path Magic? It almost certainly would require a ton of energy...but let's look at what a wish is exactly. So let's look at three different game spells (AD&D, D&D 3.XX, and GURPS 4th edition)

Advanced Dungeons & Dragons

Wish (Conjuration/Summoning)
Level:
Components: V
Range: Unlimited 
Casting Time: Special
Duration: Special 
Saving Throw: Special
Area of Effect: Special
Explanation/Description: The Wish spell is a more potent version of a Limited Wish (q.v.). If it is used to alter reality with respect to hit points sustained by a party, to bring a dead character to life, or to escape from a difficult situation by lifting the spell caster (and his or her party) from one place to another, it will not cause the magic-user any disability. Other forms of wishes, however, will cause the spell caster to be weak (-3 on strength) and require 2 to 8 days of bed rest due to the stresses the wish places upon time, space, and his or her body. Regardless of what is wished for, the exact terminology of the Wish spell is likely to be carried through. (This discretionary power of the referee is necessary in order to maintain game balance. As wishing another character dead would be grossly unfair, for example, your DM might well advance the spell caster to a future period where the object is no longer alive, i.e. putting the wishing character out of the campaign.)

Dungeons & Dragons 3.XX

Wish
Universal
Level:     Sor/Wiz 9
Components:     V, XP
Casting time:     1 standard action
Range:     See text
Target, Effect, or Area:     See text
Duration:     See text
Saving Throw:     See text
Spell Resistance:     Yes

Wish is the mightiest spell a wizard or sorcerer can cast. By simply speaking aloud, you can alter reality to better suit you. Even wish, however, has its limits. A wish can produce any one of the following effects.
  • Duplicate any wizard or sorcerer spell of 8th level or lower, provided the spell is not of a school prohibited to you.
  • Duplicate any other spell of 6th level or lower, provided the spell is not of a school prohibited to you.
  • Duplicate any wizard or sorcerer spell of 7th level or lower even if it’s of a prohibited school.
  • Duplicate any other spell of 5th level or lower even if it’s of a prohibited school.
  • Undo the harmful effects of many other spells, such as geas/quest or insanity.
  • Create a nonmagical item of up to 25,000 gp in value.
  • Create a magic item, or add to the powers of an existing magic item.
  • Grant a creature a +1 inherent bonus to an ability score. Two to five wish spells cast in immediate succession can grant a creature a +2 to +5 inherent bonus to an ability score (two wishes for a +2 inherent bonus, three for a +3 inherent bonus, and so on). Inherent bonuses are instantaneous, so they cannot be dispelled. Note: An inherent bonus may not exceed +5 for a single ability score, and inherent bonuses to a particular ability score do not stack, so only the best one applies.
  • Remove injuries and afflictions. A single wish can aid one creature per caster level, and all subjects are cured of the same kind of affliction. For example, you could heal all the damage you and your companions have taken, or remove all poison effects from everyone in the party, but not do both with the same wish. A wish can never restore the experience point loss from casting a spell or the level or Constitution loss from being raised from the dead.
  • Revive the dead. A wish can bring a dead creature back to life by duplicating a resurrection spell. A wish can revive a dead creature whose body has been destroyed, but the task takes two wishes, one to recreate the body and another to infuse the body with life again. A wish cannot prevent a character who was brought back to life from losing an experience level.
  • Transport travelers. A wish can lift one creature per caster level from anywhere on any plane and place those creatures anywhere else on any plane regardless of local conditions. An unwilling target gets a Will save to negate the effect, and spell resistance (if any) applies.
  • Undo misfortune. A wish can undo a single recent event. The wish forces a reroll of any roll made within the last round (including your last turn). Reality reshapes itself to accommodate the new result. For example, a wish could undo an opponent’s successful save, a foe’s successful critical hit (either the attack roll or the critical roll), a friend’s failed save, and so on. The reroll, however, may be as bad as or worse than the original roll. An unwilling target gets a Will save to negate the effect, and spell resistance (if any) applies.
You may try to use a wish to produce greater effects than these, but doing so is dangerous. (The wish may pervert your intent into a literal but undesirable fulfillment or only a partial fulfillment.)
            Duplicated spells allow saves and spell resistance as normal (but save DCs are for 9th-level spells).

Material Component: When a wish duplicates a spell with a material component that costs more than 10,000 gp, you must provide that component.

XP Cost: The minimum XP cost for casting wish is 5,000 XP. When a wish duplicates a spell that has an XP cost, you must pay 5,000 XP or that cost, whichever is more. When a wish creates or improves a magic item, you must pay twice the normal XP cost for crafting or improving the item, plus an additional 5,000 XP. 

GURPS 4th edition

Great Wish (VH)
Enchantment
This spell can do just about anything.

In particular:
(1) It can be used to cast any one spell, at no energy cost, with automatic
success and no chance of resistance (for spells with variable cost, the maximum energy available is 1,000). The caster does not have to know the spell, or even have it in a book – he just has
to know the spell exists. If the spell is a “continuing” one, it is up to the GM to determine how long it should last.
(2) It can permanently improve a character’s scores. It will increase any one attribute by 1 level, or any one skill or spell by 3 levels. It can also reduce an enemy’s scores, but only if that enemy is present when the wish is made.
(3) It will grant any one advantage worth 20 points or less, or remove any one disadvantage worth 20 points or less. An enemy can likewise be cursed by losing an advantage or gaining a disadvantage, but only if that enemy is present when the wish is made. The enemy does not get a chance to resist!
(4) It can do absolutely anything else that the GM feels will not ridiculously unbalance the adventure or the campaign!

Though incredibly powerful, this spell is not used often. It can never be learned at a level better than 15. Furthermore, any failed roll when creating a Great Wish costs the caster, and each helper, 1 point of IQ and 6d damage! Critical failures have toppled civilizations. Great Wishes are not normally found for sale. If they are, the price should be at least $100,000.

Cost: 2,000.

Prerequisites: Magery 3, Wish, and a combined DX and IQ of 30+.

Looking at all three versions tells us a few things that they all have in common. They can...
  • Raise the dead.
  • Grant permanent bonuses/powers/effects on a subject.
  • Allow the casting of other spells that the mage may or may not know.
  • Undo events of the past.
Other stuff is also possible (obviously), but based wholly on the GM's judgement. Going from there we can then assume that a Ritual Path Magic "Wish spell" should be able to do, at minimum, any of those things. But more importantly, it should be able to do all of those things. This can cause problems though because the way Ritual Path magic works is to define the effects of what you want to do so that you can define the spell. So a single spell that can do multiple things is actually kind of problematic. Were I too try to design such a spell I'd probably apply the rules for Alternative Abilities to Spell Effects/Paths/Modifiers. For example, if a Fireball-type spell allowed you to pick between it having fragmentation damage or piercing armor, it might look something like this:

Firebolt
Spell Effects: Greater Create Energy.
Inherent Modifiers: Damage, External Burning (Armor Piercing (5) or Hot Fragmentation, 10d (0.2)).
Greater Effects: 1 (x3).

This spell conjures a bolt of fire that the caster can then throw at a target. It does either 6d(5) burning damage or 6d [10d(0.2)] burning damage.

Typical Casting: Greater Create Energy (6) + Damage, External Burning 6d (Armor Piercing (5) or Hot Fragmentation, 10d (0.2)) (40*). 138 energy (46x3).
* This includes 1/5 the cost of the Hot Fragmentation enhancement.


Going with that you could then create a "Wish" type spell - though it may not be enough. Since a Wish spell can do basically anything you'd need to extend the Alternative Abilities logic a bit more. Perhaps (and I haven't playtested this so I have no idea how it might work) charging a energy cost equal to five times the normal amount and requiring a Greater Transform Magic effect to achieve the desired results. So a "wish" ritual might look like:

Wish
Spell Effects: Greater Transform Magic.
Inherent Modifiers: Meta-Magic.
Greater Effects: 1 (x3).

This spell allows the caster to recreate the effects of any other spell of up to 200 energy.

Typical Casting: Greater Transform Magic (8) + Meta-Magic, 200 energy (1000). 3,024 energy (1.008x3).

...which is a lot. Which may be a indicator that the spell might be a bit too much. I don't know - it needs playtesting (and please let me know if you do!).

For spells that grant the subject permanent traits, either use the Slow and Sure Enchanting (GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 34) if it grants the caster permanent abilities or require that casting such a spell costs the caster a number of unspent character points equal to the amount whatever trait it grants gives. Alternatively, a hybrid of the two could be used, using Slow and Sure Enchanting to gain the points that the spell would require. Even more optional might be to allow a spell to grant permanent traits by multiplying the final cost of the trait by five. If you use any of the following, please shoot me a email, comment below, or drop me a line on the forums - I'll be very interested in knowing what worked well, what broke, and what just didn't work.