Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Gamemaster's Guidepost: A Novel Approach to GMing, Part 1: The Plot Thickens


Guest Post by Scott "Rocketman" Rochat

“You’re a GM, not an author. Don’t railroad!”

Sound familiar? Sooner or later, it seems every guide to gamemastering includes that little gem, a reminder that this is a collaborative hobby, where everyone’s imagination counts. Don’t lock the players into a restrictive plot, we’re told, don’t predetermine your ending, and never, ever assume the story will go the way you expect it.
All of that’s good advice. But there’s another side to it. Because deep down, the tools of an author can be very useful to a GM.

This is the first of a series looking at the points where an author’s world and a GM’s collide. If that sounds like an unholy crossroads, it’s one that’s been well-traveled. Authors of the strange like China Miéville (The City & the City), painfully realistic playwrights like David Lindsay-Abaire (Rabbit Hole), and even Game of Thrones author/executioner George R.R. Martin all have roleplaying in their past, and often their present. Crossovers between these fields of the imagination are almost inevitable – Martin’s Wild Cards anthology series was born from his old Superworld campaign, while mystery writer Sharyn McCrumb put her D&D and convention experience to good use in writing the Edgar-winning  Bimbos of the Death Sun.

So, yes, the pen can be mightier than the +2 Vorpal Sword, or at least give it plenty to do. And it starts with a writer’s asset and a gamer’s dread – plot.



No railroad, but plenty of timetables
When I  first started roleplaying in grade school, most of my adventures had a strict plot. Most of the time, this was provided for me, in the form of a handy module with dialogue boxes and carefully-guided action. Sometimes this resulted from my desire to replay the action of a favorite movie, like Goldfinger or Raiders of the Lost Ark, both of which had handy-dandy game systems available for their particular worlds.
It’s not a bad way to learn roleplaying. But it can create bad habits for a GM, who can be tempted to follow his story come hell or high water. The webcomic GM of the Rings captures the tunnel vision perfectly:

GM: After many hard days of travel, you reach Weathertop.
Aragorn: You know what, guys? I’m thinking ... screw that.
GM: You are too weary to go on tonight. You must rest, and there is nowhere else around to make camp.
Frodo: Forget it. No way am I climbing that thing.
GM: You’re so tired that the ground around here is not restful enough. You need to rest in the more comfortable area on TOP of the hill.

Do this too often and you may as well write the script and open a theatre company. But there is a way to keep some structure in your game while preserving player freedom: timetables.
The idea is a familiar one to mystery and thriller writers, where the precise timing of events can be very important. Take the bad guy’s plan and plot it out from first step to last, giving each step a day, time and description. Assuming no interference from the heroes, this is what will happen.
Of course, it’s the heroes’ job to interfere! And this is where a timetable shows its beauty. When the PCs investigate, you already know where the bad guys will be and when. This means you can:

  • Lay intelligent clues. (The PCs check out a cafe where a crooked PI was just two hours before. The waitress is still on duty and can give a decent description of him and his lousy tip.)
  • Provide research results. (The team’s hacker tries to track a kidnapper’s credit-card charges, to see where he’s been buying gas and food. The GM checks the “schedule” and can show that by now, he’s let Wisconsin and is into Iowa.)
  • Enjoy points of collision, when the trails cross. (The PCs prepare to investigate an adult video store. Checking times, the GM realizes their quarry is just leaving it after meeting a contact. A dramatic confrontation results!)


As the PCs interact with the story, make notes, especially of areas where the players are forcing the NPCs to change their plans on the fly. In between sessions, rewrite the timetables, showing what the new chain of events looks like. If several plot elements are in play, it’s a good idea to indicate them with different colors for your own sanity. I’ve included samples below from an In Nomine  campaign I ran, in which one PC had been abducted and the others were trying to ride to the rescue ... unaware that she had already escaped and was fleeing from both sides!

A plot structured in this manner gives authors a useful framework while still leaving room for creativity, and it can do the same for your campaign. It’s a useful tool.
Which is why next time we’ll be talking about throwing your plot out the window and rewriting on the fly.

Saturday, November 21, 2015

GURPS101: Lens for Bard - The Warsinger


When I was starting to run Dungeon Fantasy for the first time I decided that I’d make a bunch of options that I knew my players would like or use. I did this both to fill out my handout a little more and to be able to use the content later on in a publication somewhere. This is usually how I approach all game design when it comes to my personal stuff (it’s one of the reasons why I have so many articles waiting in the Vault to be published elsewhere). Like most folks who play GURPS I enjoy the design almost as much as I enjoy actually running/playing a game. Anyways, this idea makes use of a lot of concepts from my and Antoni Ten Monros’ article “Team Up!” from Pyramid #3/65: Alternate GURPS III. This special requires Pyramid #3/61: The Way of the Warrior to use (see Rallying Cry, p. 9). Warsingers takes the idea of the bard and gives it a martial bent, then just runs with it. With lots of “buffing” and “debuffing” power-ups, it’s a handy addition to any delving party...

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Thursday, November 19, 2015

GURPS101: Tactfully Tactical - More Uses For Tactics


So +Douglas Cole talks about a few more uses for the Tactics skill in a recent blog post. I've already covered Evaluate as a skill. But the idea of Tactics doing is certainly a great springboard. So what would I do? Well, like always, I have a few ideas at hand.


More Tactical Effects
Besides its Basic Set uses, Tactics might be used for any of the following:

"Better Lucky Than Good": For those that have spent at least 12 points in Tactics, the GM can allow a roll at -10 once per session to have a fortuitous circumstance in combat. Use the rules for Serendipity (p. B83), but the circumstance must be combat-related somehow. For example, this could allow a leader to have a perfect ambush spot or find the best bivouac for his forces, but it couldn't provide extra gear or equipment.

"I Know That You Know That I Know": By everyone on your side (up to your Leadership level) taking a -2 to their skill rolls to attack for the remainder of combat, they gain a +1 to all Active Defenses against a specific enemy group (e.g., all goblins your side are currently in combat with or the trolls living under Belagost Bridge). This requires a Tactics roll at a penalty equal to the total number of people on your side that'll gain the bonus to Defense rolls.

"An Honest Man's War": At the start of a combat, each side's leader must roll a Quick Contest of Tactics; record the margin of the winner. Whenever anyone makes a deceptive attack, Feint, Dirty Trick, etc. add 1/3 the margin (minimum of 1) as a bonus to offset the penalty inflicted. For example, if you had succeeded your roll by 6, then you'd add +2 to you Dodge to offset the Deceptive Attack your opponent just used on you. This bonus lasts for a number of rounds equal to the leader's points in Tactics / 4, minimum of 1.

"About Face!": Once per person, per combat you may make a Tactics roll to get them to change their facing by barking an order, helping them move, etc. For every five points by which you succeed (minimum of 1), they may shift their facing one hex to the left or right. This takes a Concentrate maneuver, successful or not.

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Boil and Bubble: Money On My Magic and Magic On My Money


So Matt Riggsby's "GURPS Dungeon Fantasy Treasures: Glittering Prizes" came out recently (I was one of the playtesters) and it's useful for worldbuilders in general, not just those who play Dungeon Fantasy. (See here for Matt's Designer's Notes.) One of the things he included there was a cool little throwaway line:
"For example, if mystical techniques can easily store, combine, and subdivide magical energy – expressed as Fatigue Points rather than as weights of metal – that might from the basis for a currency in a highly magical society."
Anders (who is forever asking interesting questions) asked the following in this post:
"So suppose there was a magicratic civilization that used materialized FP as currency. How much would 1 FP be worth?"
To which there were numerous replies by everyone, including myself. (there was even a whole new post started here). So I got to thinking...how would you create a FP-based currency? First, let's just assume that this "mana money" can be tapped to restore your lost FP or to cast a spell right then (not your power item or someone else's, though see the notes on Lend Energy at the bottom). Actually tapping the FP contained in the currency takes two seconds: one to remove it from your money pouch and another to make a Will roll to actually get the energy from it. Alternatively, if using the mana money to power a spell immediately vs. just restoring your own lost FP, make a Will-based spell roll instead. You may pull multiple FP from large amounts of mana money at once, but no more than your (Will + Casting Talent) /2 per minute. Lend Energy is the only way to help another person "tap" into mana money.

Using Paut as a base (since it's already described as "liquid mana"), 1 FP is worth $33.75. For sake of play let's just round that to $33 per 1 FP. Break that down further into coinage (using regular DF coin weights)  and you might have something like:

Copperfield ($11/coin) (diameter: 0.589") (-12 SM) (weight: 0.01598351 lbs.)
Prospero ($33/coin) (diameter: 0.559”) (‑12 SM) (weight: 0.003990367 lbs.)
Merlin ($135/coin) (diameter: 0.456”) (‑12 SM) (weight: 0.003990367 lbs.)

Thus it takes 3 Copperfields to make a Prospero and (about) 4 Prosperos to make a Merlin.

Saturday, November 14, 2015

Boil and Bubble: Inaugural Post



Since I talk about magic a lot on my blog, I figured that it might deserve its own post.header, so today I'm launching "Boil and Bubble."

So what will this series cover? Just about everything to do with magic (except actual magic gear or enchanted items - the Hurt Locker covers that!), alchemy, magical systems, tweaks to existing systems, new systems (if I'm feeling ambitious), and so on. Some previous posts will be retagged and re-headed under this new series to enable faster searching.

Thursday, November 12, 2015

GURPS101: Alternate HP and Healing


So +Peter V. Dell'Orto threw down this interesting post about an alternative approach to how HP can affect your healing. Normally, at HP 20 you multiply all sources of healing by two, at HP 30 you multiply them by three, and so on. Now, that works well enough - if you have monstrous HP then you get monstrous reincorporation. But what if even a small increase in HP were useful? Well, I got a few ideas.


The Decimation of the Hit Point
Every HP you have above 10 increases your total healing by 10%; round down. For most creatures this isn't going to matter unless they receive 10 HP or more (such as a 10 HP casting of Major Healing by someone with at least Magery 5). Where it gets interesting (and useful) as Peter notes is when you get to HP 15 at which point even a relatively minor 2 HP restored gets you another 1 HP of healing.

Alternatively, the GM can easily say that the reverse is true as well and that low HP reduces the healing multiplier by an equivalent amount. So an HP of 9 means you heal 10% less.

This might not seem like much, but imagine if creatures had an affliction like this:

Enervation: One of your natural attacks has a follow-up that reduces your HP for the purposes of how fast you heal only. Affliction (HT; Disadvantage, Modified HP, +3%; Extended Duration, x30,000, +180%; Fixed Duration, +0%; Margin-Based, +0%; Follow-Up, Natural Attack, +0%; PM, -10%) [28]. Notes: Modified HP is simply HP -2 (Accessibility, only for determining healing threshold, -80%) [1]. 28 poins.


Picking Over the Bones
I think that while adding such a rule would add some complexity to game play (e.g., "What's your HP again? Okay, so you gain back an extra HP because you have a HP of 17"), but it could also be very useful! Imagine a cinematic game where the scrappy fighter heals just as fast as the brusier or where Regeneration (Slow) becomes actually useful (Note: It does let you heal faster, but it's usually a bit to slow for most games I run). Regardless, how do you muck about with healing in your games? Any special rules you use for HP or just healing in general?

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Designer's Notes: Pointless Monster Hunting

As a poster pointed out in this thread, Pointless Monster Hunting was a huge piece with a large word count (though I admit - I just submit and let the editor decide what he wants to do). It was easily as large as Alternative Ritual Path Magic and as information dense. Luckily, I got to work off of a base (Sean Punch's Pointless Looting and Slaying) which made it a ton easier than inventing this thing from whole cloth. While I was on a blogcation during the time this article was released I kind of expected a better reception since so many people wanted a pointless approach for GURPS Monster Hunters.

Regardless, I'm proud of my work (despite stand on the shoulders of giants) and I think gamers will find much use for it in the long run. It took me nearly 63 hours to write, another 30 to revise, and 20 to edit. A lot of the hassle in the design came from having to create an ability, remove the mechanics, and just explain it in words. That's a heckuva lot harder than you'd think it is. That more than anything ate my time.


Under the Hood: New Aptitudes
I took a lot of what Sean had created (what I mentally tagged as "basic abilities") and reformatted and tweaked what I needed to to make it work for GURPS Monster Hunters. I also created a bunch of new traits. Anyone curious about the "under the hood" mechanics can find the builds below:

  • Ancient Scholar: As Linguist, except that it adds "Limited, Esoteric Languages only, -65%."
  • Connected: This should be fairly obvious - it's just a packaged Contact.
  • Consecrated Aura: Mana Enhancer (Place of Power) [20/level]. See I Am a Place of Power on p. 11 of Pyramid #3/66: The Laws of Magic.
  • Consecrate Ground: This uses the rules for the Learned Prayer of the same name from GURPS Powers: Divine Favor (p. 12), with the notes from GURPS Monster Hunters 1 (p. 43)
  • Deductive Mastery: Psychometry (Active, -20%; Cosmic, Works on the Living, +50%; Hypersensory, -50%; Sensitive, +30%; Short-Range, -10%; Reliable 2, +10%) [22].
  • Grace of Heaven/Hell: This buys off Weakness from most templates and packages in an Unusual Background.
  • Gun Fu Master: Each level is Cosmic Modular Abilities (Limited, Gun Fu perks, -20%; Reduced Time 1, +20%) [10].
  • Like the Wind: This is simply the Disappear technique (GURPS Action 3, p. 16) maxed out.
  • Magical Traditionalist: This is simply Higher Purpose (Tradition); see GURPS Thaumatology: Ritual Path Magic, p. 5)
  • (Monster Type) Hunter: Higher Purpose 2 (Slay Specific Monster) [10] per level.
  • (Monster Type) Specialist: This one was a bit tricky. This is a Racial Bonus to a Skill, made into a Wildcard and Language (specific monster tongue).
  • Prophetic Dreams: As per GURPS Monster Hunters 1, p. 23, but adds Reliable to Precognition.
  • Rebirth: This is Extra Life 1 (Mysticism, -10%) [23] + Dying Action [1] + Precognition (Can only see own death, -80%) [5].
  • Seventh Son: Adds a general reaction bonus of +2 [10], Detect Supernatural (Vague, -50%) [15], +3 to DPL [15], and Unusual Background (Uncapped Serendipity and Fortune) [10].
  • Skill Specialist: Adds five levels of a Racial Skill bonus.
  • Slayer’s Strike: Affliction 1 (Fixed Duration, -0%; Follow-Up, Universal, +50%; Nuisance effect, Actual time is one second, -5%; Reduced Duration 1/60, -35%; Requires Will vs Will roll, -15%; Variable Enhancement (Accessibility, Only Negated Advantage enhancements that reduce supernatural fortitude, -50%) 150, +750%) [85]. Since it requires the expendature of one DP per use the overall cost is reduced by 1/5 or 17 points.
  • Spirit Channeling: Adds Resistant to Possession +3 [5].
  • Throwing Mastery: Each level is Super Throw 1 [10] (See GURPS Supers, p. 30).


Optional Rule: Leveled Foibles
One idea I noodled with was having a "leveled" Foible. Such a trait worked normally, but it's effects were multiplied by the level (up to three). For example, someone with "Law-Abiding 2" might suffer the effects of Truthfulness and Honesty in a single use. The upside is that you get an additional DP per level beyond the first. Having such a trait occupies an additional Foible spot. For example, you could have Law-Abiding 2, Murphy's Luck, Surly, and White Knight since it would total five Foibles total.


Optional Rule: Hunter Motivations
I was extremely disappointed in myself when I couldn't squeeze this in because one thing Pointless Monster Hunting overlooks is PK's fantastic "motivational lenses" (see GURPS Monster Hunters 1, p. 6). As an optional rule, the GM can rule that all players can take a "Hunter Motivation" which is a combination of Virtue and Foible and costs only one Aptitude slot. (Alternatively, GMs can just give all PCs a Hunter Motivation for free.) This allows for the GM to treat it as a Foible and use any listed disadvantage against the player, while the player can use it as a Virtue normally or temporarily gain one of the listed advantages.


Trait Outtake: Alternate Connected
Here's an alternate version of the Connected Aptitudes.
Connected 1-4. Gain use of a Usually Reliable Contact (p. B44) of choice, with skill of 12 (for supernatural capabilities) or 15 (for those without). Switching between contacts takes an hour as you make calls, put out the word, etc. Level 2 increases skill to 15 and 18. Level 3 increases reliability to Completely Reliable. Level 4 increases skill to 21 for both supernatural and non-supernatural contacts. Built as Slotted Comic Power 1 (16) (Immediate Preparation Required, 10 minutes, -45%; Limited, Contacts, -50%; Social, -0%); see GURPS Psionic Powers, p. 15. Higher levels increase the pool.

Saturday, November 7, 2015

GURPS101: More Bioenhancement Abilities for Monster Hunter Experiments

The Experiment template is one of the cooler ones in GURPS Monster Hunters in my opinion. They’ve got a wide-range of capabilities and have an “otherness” quality that can make them more fun to play than the inhuman if done right. But what is an experiment other than a collection of neat powers? So maybe add a free more neat powers to the mix and see what happens… in today’s special, the experiment gets some love with a couple of new Bioenhancement abilities.
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Thursday, November 5, 2015

Melee Academy: Reordering Initiative



I like noodling with alternate rules sometimes or just plain tinkering with how combat works. As I've noted before - Speed Kills. The faster you are the quicker you can attacker and the more damage you can inflict. The way GURPS combat functions combatants go in order of decreasing Basic Speed (e.g., Basic Speed 9.25 goes first, then all 9.00, then all 8.75, and so on). For gamers familiar with other systems this is a radical departure from what they are used to! In just about every popular game out there you roll for initiative and that either becomes your place in the order of initiative or you reroll every round. GURPS further confuses this by having a static, constant initiative order. Essentially, barring your opponents speed you always go at the same time in the order of initiative.

Now, this might be odd for other games, but for GURPS this is one of its tactical combat's greatest strengths. Since the order of initiative is always static each turn, things like Wait maneuvers (p. B366) and Cascading Waits (GURPS Martial Arts, p. 108) are possible without any of the wonky effects that such actions have in other game systems. You also don't have the pesky chore of recording initiative each turn, whcih can, believe it or not actually save time. Considering how complicated combat can get (without getting into tactical combat) this a plus.Basically, there is a reason that the initiative order is static and works the way it does. But what if you wanted to change that? What if you wanted the randomness of a dice roll for initiative? Well, I've got a few ideas.


Optional Rule: Dice + Adds Conversion for Basic Speed
In this initiative variant you simply take each combatant's Basic Speed and convert them into a number of dice using Dice + Adds (p. B269). For example, if you a character had a Basic Speed of 6.00, then you'd roll 1d+2 to determine your initiative. USe the following chart to quickly determine your roll:
  • 0.25 to 0.75: 1d-4
  • 1.00 to 1.75: 1d-3
  • 2.00 to 2.75: 1d-2
  • 3.00 to 3.75: 1d-1
  • 4.00 to 4.75: 1d
  • 5.00 to 5.75: 1d+1
  • 6.00 to 6.75: 1d+2
  • 7.00 to 7.75: 1d+3
  • 8.00 to 8.75: 1d+4 or 2d
  • 9.00 to 9.75: 1d+5 or 2d+1
  • etc.etc.

Optional Rule: Basic Speed + Die Roll
In this version take the combatant's Basic Speed-3 and add the roll of 1d. Fractional Basic Speed of
0.25 as 1d-3, fractions up to 0.5 as 1d-2, and any larger fraction as 1d-1..  For example, a Basic Speed of 6.00 results in a roll of 1d+3 (6 - 3 = 3).


Optional Rule: Exploding/Imploding Initiative Rolls
Using either of the above methods the GM can allow dice to "explode" when a 6 is rolled on the dice roll again and add the result to the previous roll. This can continue on indefinitely if 6s are continuously rolled! The GM could also allow a die to "implode." When a 1 is rolled on the dice, reroll it, and subtract that amount to the previous roll.


Picking Over the Bones
I'm sure there are a dozen other ways to determine initiative differently. You could for example use (Per + DX + HT) /5 or (Per + HT) /3 or any other combination. The key here is that you cannot use varying initiative orders every turn because doing so will muck with Waits and that's not something anyone wants to toy with without some serious thought. Do you have varying orders of initiative in your campaign? What method do you use?

Note: I updated this a bit because there was some problems with my math.

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

Triple Threat: Marrowsucker



Marrowsucker
Marrowsuckers are large, salamander-like creatures that resemble komado dragons with hooked, needle-like teeth. Their long, whip-like tails end with a bony protrusion that the creatures habitually rake across hard surfaces (mostly rock) to sharpen. This protrusion is attached to a series of ligaments and biomechanical “gears” that allows for it to be retracted when not in use. Marrowsuckers (unsurprisingly) consume bones and bone marrow, though they don’t mind eating flesh if they are hungry enough. They prefer fresh bones, but will eat any hard, organic, calcium-rich material.

Note: The following illustration was done by Walter Wilson aka Nymdok. Thanks, Walter! This monster is also of my own design.


Any Game Setting...
ST: 15             HP: 15             Speed: 6.00
DX: 12            Will: 10           Move: 8
IQ: 6               Per: 12            Weight: 100 lbs.
HT: 13            FP: 16             SM: 0
Dodge: 11       Parry: 11        DR: 4

Bite (14): 1d+2 impaling follow-up 1d+4 toxic. Reach C-1. If any toxic damage is done, make a HT roll (-1 per 2 HP taken), failure results in the target gaining Fragile (Brittle) for hours equal to their margin of failure. This toxic damage is not taken off a subject’s HP total – it only determines if the target gains Fragile.
Claw (14): 1d+1 cutting. Reach C.
Tail (14): 1d+1 impaling. Reach C-2.

Traits: Acute Smell and Taste 4; Combat Reflexes; Discriminatory Smell; Flexibility; Horizontal; No Fine Manipulators; Peripheral Vision; Perfect Balance; Reduced Consumption 2 (Cast Iron Stomach); Restricted Diet (Bones or Bone Marrow; Substitution); Claws (Sharp); Striker (tail; impaling; long +2); Teeth (Fangs); Wild Animal.
Skills: Brawling-14; Climbing-16; Running-16; Stealth-14.
Notes: Toxic flesh (if eaten causes 1 HP of damage per half pound); If the GM is using Intrinsic Fright Check GURPS Horror (p. 139), marrowsuckers have a modifier of -2.


For Dungeon Fantasy...
ST: 15             HP: 15             Speed: 6.00
DX: 12            Will: 10           Move: 8
IQ: 6               Per: 12            Weight: 100 lbs.
HT: 13            FP: 16             SM: 0
Dodge: 11       Parry: 11        DR: 4

Bite (14): 1d+2 impaling follow-up 1d+4 toxic. Reach C-1. If any toxic damage is done, make a HT roll (-1 per 2 HP taken), failure results in the target gaining Fragile (Brittle) for hours equal to their margin of failure. This toxic damage is not taken off a subject’s HP total – it only determines if the target gains Fragile.
Claw (14): 1d+1 cutting. Reach C.
Tail (14): 1d+1 impaling. Reach C-2.

Traits: Acute Smell and Taste 4; Combat Reflexes; Discriminatory Smell; Flexibility; Horizontal; No Fine Manipulators; Peripheral Vision; Perfect Balance; Reduced Consumption 2 (Cast Iron Stomach); Restricted Diet (Bones or Bone Marrow; Substitution); Claws (Sharp); Striker (tail; impaling; long +2); Teeth (Fangs); Wild Animal.
Skills: Brawling-14; Climbing-16; Running-16; Stealth-14.
Class: Dire Animal.
Combat Effectiveness Rating: 0 (OR 0 and PR 0).
Notes: Toxic flesh (if eaten causes 1 HP of damage per half pound).


For Monster Hunters...
ST: 18             HP: 18             Speed: 7.00
DX: 14            Will: 14           Move: 11
IQ: 6               Per: 12            Weight: 100 lbs.
HT: 14            FP: 16             SM: 0
Dodge: 11       Parry: 11        DR: 4

Fright Check: -1

Bite (14): 2d+4 impaling follow-up 2d+4 toxic. Reach C-1. If any toxic damage is done, make a HT roll (-1 per 2 HP taken), failure results in the target gaining Fragile (Brittle) for hours equal to their margin of failure. This toxic damage is not taken off a subject’s HP total – it only determines if the target gains Fragile.
Claw (14): 1d+3 cutting. Reach C.
Tail (14): 1d+2 impaling. Reach C-2.

Traits: Acute Smell and Taste 4; Combat Reflexes; Discriminatory Smell; Flexibility; Horizontal; No Fine Manipulators; Peripheral Vision; Perfect Balance; Reduced Consumption 2 (Cast Iron Stomach); Restricted Diet (Bones or Bone Marrow; Substitution); Claws (Sharp); Striker (tail; impaling; long +2); Teeth (Fangs); Wild Animal.
Skills: Brawling-16; Climbing-18; Running-17; Stealth-16.

Notes: Toxic flesh (if eaten causes 1 HP of damage per half pound); Use the skills listed under Cryptids in the Know Thy Enemy box in GURPS Monster Hunters 1: Champions (p. 16). Two to three marrowsuckers are a fair fight for one champion.

Monday, November 2, 2015

Carpe Blogiem: End of Blogcation 2015


The blogcation is at an end. in summary:

Reason #1: Solved! The man I call father had a stroke in early September, It was pretty bad. It was terrifying. He's since come through it with a speed the doctor's are calling a miracle. He's stubborn that way. Within ten months all of his facilities will be back to normal is the current projection.
Reason #2: Somewhat solved. I did get to rest and recharge, but things kept happening (I tweaked my back, some family stuff, etc.) that kept interrupting it. I actually got a lot of writing in, played a lot of chess, and quite a few fun videogames (Diablo 3 - I'm looking a you.
Reason #3:Somewhat solved. Most of the rest of the house is done, only the A/C, kitchen counter-tops (though the sink and dishwasher is installed!), the utility room cabinets, and the finished bar area remain. My room has not been touched (yet). Hopefully that will happen soon and I can only hope it's not a super-stressful time.
Reason #4: Birthday was awesome. That is all. :-)

As promised, tomorrow will resume the normal posting schedule. I've got plenty of goodies in store.


With Regards,

Christopher R. Rice